Archive for April, 2015

Gravity data show that Antarctic ice sheet is melting increasingly faster

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Researchers 'weighed' Antarctica's ice sheet using gravitational satellite data and found that during the past decade, Antarctica's massive ice sheet lost twice the amount of ice in its western portion compared with what it accumulated in the east. Their conclusion -- the southern continent's ice cap is melting ever faster....

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Listening for whales and fish in the Northwest Atlantic ocean

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Scientists are using a variety of buoys and autonomous underwater vehicles to record and archive sounds from marine mammals and fish species in the western North Atlantic through a new listening network known as the US Northeast Passive Acoustic Sensing Network (NEPAN). Researchers hope NEPAN will be the first link in an extensive listening network that would extend along the entire US East Coast, and eventually to waters around the US....

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First global review of Arctic marine mammals

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A multinational study attempted to gauge the population trends of Arctic marine mammals and changes in their habitat, identify missing scientific information, and provide recommendations for the conservation of Arctic marine mammals over the next decades....

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‘Dead zones’ found in Atlantic open waters: Moving west, could lead to mass fish kills

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Researchers have discovered areas with extremely low levels of oxygen in the tropical North Atlantic, several hundred kilometers off the coast of West Africa. The levels measured in these 'dead zones' are the lowest ever recorded in Atlantic open waters. The dead zones are created in eddies, swirling masses of water that slowly move westward. Encountering an island, they could lead to mass fish kills....

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200-year lag between climate events in Greenland, Antarctica: Ocean involved

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A new study using evidence from a highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica shows a consistent link between abrupt temperature changes on Greenland and Antarctica during the last ice age, giving scientists a clearer picture of the link between climate in the northern and southern hemispheres....

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Ancient clam beaches not so natural, study shows

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Ancient coastal Indigenous people were more than hunter-gatherers, new research shows. Researchers suggest that the Pacific Northwest is one of the few places in the world where it can be documented' that many Indigenous peoples had sophisticated marine management....

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Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows

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Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities....

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From Texas to Maine, NOAA’s Flood Information Tool Promotes Resilience



NOAA's Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper is a free online tool that provides maps, data, and information to assess risks and vulnerabilities related to coastal flooding and hazards. The tool is available for the entire U.S. East Coast and Gulf of Mexico.

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Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate

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Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming. It has been proposed that such disastrous climate effects could be offset by technological approaches. One such proposal is to artificially whiten the surface of the Arctic Ocean in order to increase the reflection of the Sun's energy into space and restore sea ice....

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Engineering a better future for the Mississippi Delta: Storm surge risks

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River deltas, low-lying landforms that host critical and diverse ecosystems as well as high concentrations of human population, face an uncertain future. Even as some deltas experience decreased sediment supply from damming, others will see increased sediment discharge from land-use changes. Accurate estimates of the current rate of subsidence in the Mississippi Delta (southern USA) are important for planning wetland restoration and predictions of storm surge flooding....

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